The nutritional informational content of beer

From sugars to carbs, calories and more, there is a lot to discover about beer. No matter which brand or style, every beer will have a different nutrition content. There are things to learn about the ingredients and brewing to help you understand the basics. This will help you make more informed choices when enjoying your favourite beer in moderation.

You can also look out for the nutrition information panels on some of your favourite beer brands. Visit our Beautiful Beers for more detail.

WHY IS THERE SO LITTLE SUGAR IN BEER?

When it comes to Beer - sugars are essential.

During the first stages of the brewing process sugars are extracted from Malted Barley and sometimes cane sugar is added to finesse the taste balance of the beer. But why is there so little sugar if it is such an important ingredient? The answer is YEAST!

Add<br/>Yeast

Add
Yeast

Yeast is added to the brew to begin fermentation.

Sugars are Fermented

Sugars are Fermented

Almost all the sugars are consumed by the yeast!

Delicious<br/>Beer

Delicious
Beer

This produces alcohol, carbon dioxide (bubbles), and delicious beer flavours.

FORGET PRESERVATIVES!

Your favourite beers, and all of the beers featured on the beautiful beers page, are preservative free, meaning no substance has been added with the sole purpose of prolonging shelf life.

Reason #1

Reason #1

Hops, the spice of beer, and alcohol are both natural preservatives which help to keep beer fresher for longer.

Reason #2

Reason #2

Breweries handle beer under hygienic conditions and use packaging technology that prevents bacterial contamination.

BEER AND CARBOHYDRATES?

Beer is brewed using cereal grains like barley and wheat which are mostly made up of carbohydrate such as starch. Sugar, which is also a source of carbohydrates may occasionally be added as an ingredient.

How is beer low in carbohydrate if two ingredients are so high in carbohydrate?

Starch and Sugar

Starch and Sugar

There are 2 types of carbohydrates used in brewing; starches (from grain) and any added sugar.

Starch breaks down into Sugar

Starch breaks down into Sugar

In the early stages of brewing, the starches from grain are broken down into sugar. This means prior to adding yeast, almost all the carbohydrates in the brew are in the form of sugar!

Sugar is Fermented

Sugar is Fermented

Yeast eats almost all these sugars during the fermentation process to produce alcohol and fizzy carbon dioxide!

CALORIES

THE HUMAN BODY NEEDS ENERGY TO SURVIVE AND FUEL EVERYDAY BODY PROCESSES. IF ENJOYED RESPONSIBLY AND IN MODERATION, BEER CAN BE CONSUMED AS PART OF A BALANCED LIFESTYLE.

The Beautiful Beers

The Beautiful Beers

All the beers featured on this website contain between 79 and 156 calories per serve. To find out how many calories are in your favourite beer head to The Beautiful Beers.

2080<br/>calories

2080
calories

As per the Australian and New Zealand Food Standards Code, 2080 calories is the average daily calorie intake recommended for adults. People may need more or less energy, depending on their age, gender and physical activity levels.

Lower strength<br/>full in flavour

Lower strength
full in flavour

The majority of calories in beer come from the alcohol content. Replacing full strength beer with mid to low strength beers (2.5% ABV or less) can be a great way to help reduce your calorie intake.

MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICES

ALCOHOL HAS BEEN ENJOYED BY PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD FOR CENTURIES. WHEN ENJOYED IN MODERATION, BEER CAN FORM PART OF A BALANCED LIFESTYLE. ALCOHOL AFFECTS EACH OF US IN DIFFERENT WAYS, DEPENDING ON YOUR AGE, SIZE, GENDER, ETHNICITY, FITNESS AND BODY MAKE-UP, AND INTAKE OF FOOD. MAKE THE DECISION THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR ALCOHOL INTAKE.

One hour

One hour

On average, it takes 1 hour for the human body to process 1 standard drink (10 grams of alcohol). The size of a standard drink varies according to the type of alcoholic beverage and the alcohol content.

Standard Drinks

Standard Drinks

New Zealand drinking guidelines recommend no more than 2 standard drinks a day for women or 3 standard drinks a day for men to reduce long term harm, and no more than 4 standard drinks in one occasion for women or 5 standard drinks in one occasion for men to reduce the risk of short term harm.

For more information, visit www.cheers.org.nz or www.alcohol.org.nz

The Golden Rules

The Golden Rules

3 simple ways you can ensure you are being a responsible beer drinker.

Size Know how big a standard drink is.
Pace Remember your body can only process one standard drink an hour – there’s no way to speed it up.
Space Drink water and eat a meal to give your body time to process your beer.